Ways to be
a better Ally

Image by Mercedes Mehling

Get Involved in Community Pride Events

Visit Ogden Pride, Utah Pride, and our website for updates on upcoming events.
 

Rainbow Flag

Don't Assume Someone's Gender or Pronouns

Language matters. Ensure the proper use of pronouns. If you are ever unsure, simply ask. If you mess up it’s okay. Apologize and simply ask for guidance. Make sure to ask a person when and where it is safe to utilize their chosen name and pronouns. Asking about someone’s “real” name or referring to someone by the dead name is invasive and disrespectful. Correct people if they misgender someone, promote diversity in the workplace, speak up against insensitive language, and show your support by wearing a pin or posting a flag. 

Gay Pride Celebrations

Defend Against LGBTQ+ Discrimination

Think of “ally” as an action rather than a simple label. To act as a true ally you must actively support LGBTQIA+ rights and defend LGBTQIA+ people against discrimination. Don't be afraid to speak up when someone uses hurtful words or you see someone doing harmful actions. 

Paper Heart

Confront Your Own Prejudice and Biases

Being an ally sometimes means challenging your own stereotypes, assumptions, and unconscious biases you didn’t even realize you had. It's difficult to understand the realities of discrimination without experiencing them first-hand. Acknowledging our social advantages can be challenging but is essential to becoming a better ally. 

Rainbow Color Lights

Stand Up Against Hate and Harmful Jokes

Anti-LGBTQ+ comments and jokes are harmful. It is essential to let your friends, family, and co-workers know that as an ally you find them offensive and hurtful to the community. LGBTQIA+ prejudices can be subtle and transphobia and biphobia exist even within the community, so being open to self-improvement is always worth working on. Encouraging conversation is one of the best ways to encourage allyship, so don’t be afraid to hold people accountable and stand against damaging language. 

Rainbow Socks

Support LGBTQIA+

owned businesses

Businesses have a responsibility to their employees to provide them with a workplace where they feel safe and comfortable. That should always include LGBTQ+ employees. 

LGBTQ Flags Center

Educate Yourself on the History of Pride

Many of the historic events of the past are either widely unknown or overshadowed by the festivities celebrated throughout the month. Make sure to enlighten yourself on the history that led to the progress today prior to attending your local pride events. Learn about the Stonewall riots, Harvey Milk, or watch pride forward films such as Drag Race or Paris is Burning. You can also visit the history page on our website to learn about important historical figures, local heroes, pride flags, and the timeline of LGBTQ+ rights. 

Pride Holding Hands

Add Pronouns to Your Social Media & Introductions

Start the conversation by presenting your pronouns first, whether that be through adding them to your social media bios or introducing yourself in everyday conversations. 

Pride Parade

Donate to, or Advocate for LGBTQ+ causes

Talk about trans issues/rights.  Engage people in discussions & share your knowledge. If you are a cisgender person, be aware of the role you can play as an ally. Remember that the way you talk about people can make a difference in whether we feel safe/comfortable. There are many organizations you can volunteer or donate to such as GLSEN, The Ali Forney Center, The Trevor Project, Encircle, and SAGE. For more information on these organizations you can visit our other resources page. 

Pride Fashion

Be Open to Learn, Listen, and Educate Yourself

Recognize that there is diversity among identities that intersect with race, class, size, sexual orientation, immigration status, and more. Take a moment to learn the many flags and different identities and sexual orientations. Gender and sexuality are not the same and span over a broad spectrum. A good LGBTQ ally understands how to lift up not just queer voices but black queer voices, queer sex workers’ voices, and impoverished trans people’s voices, among other identities. 

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The 14-page, full-size, in-color zine includes the collected artwork of local LGBTQ+ identifying artists: poetry, astrology, “queerscopes,” paintings, digital and mixed-media art, and fictional stories are among the offerings to be enjoyed by readers. “The LQ” was created to help unite the queer community, said Kye Hallows, “because we know how large it is and think that it might help others who aren’t familiar with the scene to feel supported and seen.” The art zines, funded by an Ogden Arts Grant, are available for purchase exclusively at Hallows’ record shop, Lavender Vinyl, located on Historic 25th Street.

                                                               - Standard-Examiner

                                               Instagram: @the_lq_, https://linktr.ee/lqzine